Governors and FCT Minister

By Kazeem Ugbodaga

With the second wave of COVID-19 rearing its ugly head in Nigeria, the nation has been grappling with a deadlier resurgence of the virus. The first wave was simply a joke, but events of the last one month showed that Nigeria is in trouble if pragmatic efforts are not made to stem the tide. During the first wave, we were recording COVID-19 cases in hundreds, but now, we have them in thousands.

Right now, the nation has 95,934 confirmed cases of Coronavirus, with 77,982 survivors discharged and 1,330 deaths recorded so far. Also, 16,622 active cases currently exist in Nigeria as at January 7, 2021.

There are five States in the country to avoid right now or where extreme cautiousness should be exercised when visiting or transacting businesses in them. Nigerians should move with trepidation in these states. They are the Coronavirus hotbeds right now in the country.

The States are:

1. Lagos

Sanwo-Olu

Just like the first wave of the virus, Lagos remains the epicentre of COVID-19. The State is setting and breaking records almost on daily basis. On Thursday, 7 January, 2020, Lagos recorded the highest single day Coronavirus infections in the country by any State. It posted 807 cases. That represents 51.56 percent of infections recorded by the nation that day.

Overall, Lagos accounts for 35.58 percent (34, 136 cases) confirmed COVID-19 infections since the pandemic broke out in February 2020. The state has also posted 250 deaths, accounting for 18.8 percent of deaths nationwide. But Lagos has been able to discharge 28,039 patients who survived the virus. This account for 35.9 percent survival rate.

Currently, Lagos has 5,847 active cases of COVID-19 cases, representing 35.2 percent of active cases. The isolation centres are getting filled again, with several cases being raked in on daily basis. Therefore, anyone visiting Lagos to transact business must be extremely careful as serious community transmission is in place. The virus is being fuelled by many who don’t believe it exists anymore in Nigeria, violating COVID-19 protocols.

2. Abuja

FCT Minister Mohammed Musa Bello

The Federal Capital Territory, FCT, Abuja, has been recording huge cases of COVID-19 infections. The FCT is next to Lagos and has in some cases taking over lead from the State. The FCT’s highest record in a single day has been 407 cases posted on January 6, 2021. Abuja accounts for 13,071 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the country. This represents 13.6 percent of national infections.

With 106 deaths reported, the FCT accounts for 7.96 percents of deaths recorded in the country. In terms of discharge rate, it has reported 7,749 recoveries so far, representing 9,9 percent of national recoveries.

Active COVID-19 cases in Abuja stand at 5,216, accounting for 31.4 percent of national burden. Right now, Abuja is the second hottest COVID-19 hotbed in the country. Residents and others must move with trepidation in the city, as well as keep strictly to COVID-19 protocols.

3. Kaduna

Governor Nasir El-Rufai

Though Kaduna has recorded more confirmed cases of COVID-19 (5,717) than Oyo, it does not have huge active cases (437) than the state. Kaduna accounts for approximately six percent of national confirmed cases and 2.6 percent national active cases and 4.1 percent (437) of national deaths rate.

4. Plateau

Gov. Simon Lalong of Plateau State.

Plateau State has raked in 5,381 confirmed cases of COVID-19, accounting for 5.6 percent of national figures and 433 active cases, representing 2.6 percent national active cases. The State has so far discharged 4,903 survivors, representing 6.3 percent recoveries and 45 deaths (3.4 national deaths rate).

5. Oyo

Governor Seyi Makinde of Oyo State

Oyo State is the 5th COVID-19 hotbeds in Nigeria right now. Active cases in the State is put at 673, representing four percent of national active cases. It has total confirmed coronavirus cases of 4,157, accounting for 4.3 percent of national confirmed cases. Oyo has reported 53 deaths. This represents 3.98 percent of national deaths. So far, it has discharged 3,431 survivors, accounting for 4.3 national recoveries.