The level of depravity to which our youths have descended was made evident by the shocking discovery that was made recently at a Lagos secondary school.

The authorities of the junior arm of Oriwu College in Ikorodu were shocked to know that some of their students had converted a spot in the school to a sex corner. The joint, which has now been dismantled, was a place where male and female students went to have sex during school hours.

It was also discovered that some students of the school had been patronising a witch doctor who charged them about N2000 to make potions which they thought could help them obtain favour from fellow students and teachers. It was also to ensure that they remained unpunished even when they flouted rules made by the school.

A teacher in the same school disclosed that students had been watching pornography on their mobile phones during lecture hours.

Her words: “You can imagine some of the students watching pornographic films while the teacher is in the class teaching them. The school’s principal has seized so many phones from these students. We have a big problem.”

Early this year, there was a report on the new practice adopted by secondary school girls. The practice known as “sexting” involves girls taking photographs of their own private parts and circulating same among friends and the photographs find their way on the internet.

The issue of moral depravity in schools calls for the concern of parents, teachers, government and whoever can be referred to as a stakeholder in the education sector. It is not only the standard of education that has fallen but also the moral values in schools.

We have had cases of cultism in schools. This is no longer restricted to the universities and other tertiary institutions; it has spread to the secondary schools and lately it is said to have gone down to the primary school level.

Values have changed! Youngsters rather than spend hours in a painstaking study of textbooks would  spend hours browsing internet sites that add little or no value to their lives. They are more concerned about having fun than reading their books.

Many of the youngsters admire the wayward lifestyle of some Hollywood, Nollywood and secular music stars and of course strive to imbibe them. The era of a healthy competition among school boys and girls to come out in flying colours seems to be a thing of the past. Examination malpractices are becoming more commonplace as the only way the lazy students can make a headway in their education. Parents, tachers as well as officials of examination bodies aid students in cheating during exams.

The negative implication of this is nothing but frightening. If nothing is done to arrest this ugly trend then we can be sure of producing uncouth, unruly, thoroughly depraved and intellectually spineless adults. Government, teachers, parents, religious bodies and relevant non-government organisations should take urgent steps to bring an end to this problem.